NTTA Ombudsman

 NTTA Ombudsman: Our Commitment to Customer Service

 The North Texas Tollway Authority is committed to providing motorists outstanding customer service, both on and off the road.  With this in mind, the NTTA established a pilot Ombudsman program to review customer concerns in an unbiased and impartial manner. 
 
The NTTA Ombudsman ensures fairness and consistency by reviewing disputed invoices that are unable to be resolved in its Customer Service Department.  Separate from the collections process, the program is carried out by the Internal Audit Department, which reports directly to the NTTA Board of Directors.  The Ombudsman will address customer concerns, review the escalation and dispute resolution process to ensure NTTA followed its established business rules, and determine whether the issue was handled appropriately and equitably.
 
A summary of circumstances and responses is listed below with all personally identifiable information removed in compliance with customer privacy laws and guidelines.  For more details about the NTTA Ombudsman program, please contact the NTTA at 972-818-6882 or CustomerService@ntta.org.
 

 CUSTOMER #0022
 
Summary of Circumstances:  The customer drove on NTTA toll roads, and an invoice was mailed to the registered owner of the vehicle based on Texas Department of Motor Vehicles records.  After not receiving payment within 30 days, the NTTA sent a First Notice of Nonpayment, which included an administrative fee.  The customer disputes receiving the original ZipCash invoice prior to the First Notice of Nonpayment and has expressed concern over the amount owed, which includes tolls plus an assessed administrative fee.  The customer stated that the neighborhood mail carrier frequently makes mistakes in delivering the mail to the proper address and that the customer received only the First Notice of Nonpayment. The customer continued driving on the toll roads and received an additional ZipCash invoice for those transactions.  The customer does not dispute receiving a later ZipCash invoice. 
 
Ombudsman’s Response:  The Ombudsman reviewed the customer’s transactions and determined that the customer does not have a TollTag account.  The customer contacted the NTTA Board of Directors and NTTA Customer Service several times as described below.
 

January 28, 2013 – The customer sent an email to NTTA Customer Service stating that he/she just received a First Notice of Nonpayment that included an administrative fee and that he/she was ready to make payment if the administrative fee was removed.  The customer service representative responded by explaining the NTTA mailed a ZipCash invoice and a First Notice of Nonpayment via the U.S. Postal Service and used the USPS Track-n-Trace service to confirm mailing and critical letter handling dates.

January 31, 2013 – The customer called the NTTA inquiring about invoices that had been received.  The customer stated that he/she would not pay the administrative fees incurred since the neighborhood mail carrier does not always deliver the mail to the correct address.  The customer service representative explained that NTTA confirmed mailing through USPS Track-n-Trace, and therefore the administrative fees would not be waived.  Customer then asked to speak with a customer service supervisor.  The supervisor reiterated the same information.  The customer again stated that he/she would not pay the accrued administrative fees because of the problems with the mail carrier.  The supervisor offered to waive the administrative fees if the customer opened a TollTag account and maintained it for the next six months.  The customer declined the offer.  The supervisor explained if invoices are not paid in full they will continue accrue additional fees, would eventually be sent to the collection agency and possible further legal action.  At that time the customer did not make payment on an additional ZipCash invoice, which included tolls only.

March 19, 2013 – The customer sent an email to the NTTA Board of Directors concerning the two invoices that he/she received, stating that he/she did not agree with paying the administrative fees since he/she allegedly did not receive the original ZipCash invoice for the first invoice.  The email was forwarded to the NTTA Director of Customer Service to research and resolution.  Both invoices had not yet been paid, incurring additional administrative fees as a result.

March 20, 2013 – The director responded to customer with the history of the invoices, including the address to which all invoices were mailed.  The director reiterated that the administrative fees would not be waived since USPS Track-n-Trace confirmed mailing and that the address on the invoices was not flagged as undeliverable.

The use of Track-n-Trace is recognized as a reliable mail tracking tool.  The processing and invoicing of these transactions complied with state law and NTTA business rules. 
 
ZipCash customers receive invoices for their tolls based on their toll road usage, and invoices are mailed to the registered owner of the vehicle based on Texas Department of Motor Vehicle records. The longer a ZipCash invoice remains unpaid, the higher the related fees will escalate.  Customers can avoid any fees by paying their ZipCash invoices, which cover tolls only, within 30 days or by opening a TollTag account backed by cash or credit card.  For more information about the ZipCash billing process, https://www.ntta.org/AboutUs/WaysToPay.
 

 
CUSTOMER #0021
 
Summary of Circumstances: Customer expressed concern over the amount owed for tolls as a result of his/her TollTag having a negative balance.  Customer was told that as of September 2012 TollTag customers whose accounts have a negative balance are charged the ZipCash toll rate until the account is brought back to a positive balance.  The customer stated that he/she is not willing to pay the ZipCash rate because he/she is a TollTag holder.
 
Ombudsman’s Response: The Ombudsman reviewed the customer’s transactions and determined that the customer established a TollTag account on Jan. 5, 2005. 
 
Since December 2007, the customer has allowed the account to go into a negative balance eight times, received 46 “No Balance” notifications via United State Postal Service (USPS), and received one “Credit Card Expired” notification via USPS. 
 
The TollTag License Agreement states “…your account is a prepay account which means you must maintain sufficient funds in your account with the NTTA to cover tolls and charges for the use of your tag…. The NTTA must receive payment at one of our TollTag locations before your account reaches $0 to avoid the incurrence of toll violations…. You remain and will remain responsible for providing accurate information to the NTTA regarding your account and for updating your account information when it changes….” 
 
According to NTTA business rules, transactions that are invoiced because the associated TollTag account has a negative balance can be collected at the ZipCash rate.
 
The processing and invoicing of these transactions complied with the NTTA business rules.
 
TollTag customers receive ZipCash invoices because of incorrect or missing information in their accounts.  For example, the customer who gets a new car or license plate but doesn’t update the TollTag account will receive ZipCash bills based on the new car/license plate information, which is not associated with a TollTag.   Or, a customer will receive ZipCash bills when the credit card information on file will no longer accept charges (e.g., expired card number, closed account, etc.), causing the TollTag account to hit a $0 balance. Similarly, a customer who fails to replenish funds in a cash-backed TollTag account will receive ZipCash ills when the account reaches a $0 balance.   
 
As part of NTTA’s efforts to ensure all drivers pay their fair share of tolls, the NTTA now requires TollTag customers who receive ZipCash bills to pay the ZipCash rate.  In the past the NTTA would work with customers by reducing these tolls to the lower TollTag rate as a gesture of goodwill in hopes that they would maintain a positive TollTag account balance going forward.  However, many customers regularly allow their TollTags to fall into arrears, which increases NTTA’s costs and reduces NTTA’s productivity.
 
Unfortunately, these situations place an undue strain on the NTTA’s finances as well as customer service levels.  NTTA incurs additional costs in these situations, just as it does for any ZipCash customer, so the NTTA is simply asking them to pay their fair share. 
 
Because of the additional time required to process and collect these tolls, TollTag customers are asked to pay for tolls at the higher ZipCash rate.  Once the account is returned to good standing, the customer will be billed at the preferred and lower TollTag rate. 
 
TollTag customers can ensure accurate billing and avoid receiving ZipCash invoices by updating their TollTag accounts anytime they have changes to their vehicle, license plate, or credit/debit card information.  Customers can make updates quickly and easily online at www.NTTA.org or by calling NTTA at 972-818-NTTA (6882).
 

CUSTOMER #0020
 
Summary of Circumstances:  A vehicle registered in another state is driven by the owner’s family member who moved to Texas July 2011.  The driver was misinformed by co-workers that cars with out-of-state plates are not charged for tolls incurred.  Invoices totaling more than $1,000 with transactions dating back to July 2011 were received by the registered owner of the vehicle in the other state.  After contacting the NTTA, the owner was offered an extended payment plan but did not find the terms acceptable.  The owner was agreeable to paying the tolls incurred April 30 through May 30, 2012 since those had been invoiced after 30 days.  However, the owner asked the NTTA to excuse all other tolls since the owner was unaware of the charges and they were not billed in a timely manner.
 
Ombudsman’s Response:  The Ombudsman reviewed the registered vehicle owner’s transactions and determined that the customer established a TollTag account on May 31, 2012. 
 
The NTTA requested vehicle ownership information from its third party provider on April 30, 2012 and received it May 9, 2012.  Because the car is registered in another state and has an out-of-state license plate, the request and matching of information is a manual process, which takes more time than the automated process for vehicles registered in Texas.
 
The initial invoices included only tolls for the ZipCash transactions; no administrative fees were charged.
 
Customer contacted NTTA as follows:
·         May 30, 2012 – The owner contacted the NTTA regarding the invoices for transactions dated from 2011 through 2012.
·         May 30, 2012 – The owner was offered an extension of invoice due dates to December 2012.
·         June 4, 2012 - The owner sent a letter to NTTA customer service management.
·         June 7, 2012 – NTTA customer service management responded stating that the tolls-only amount of $1,236.75 could not be reduced and offered to extend the payment due dates in order to avoid any future administrative fees being incurred.  Management also advised that vehicle information had been obtained from the vehicle owner’s state department of motor vehicles.
·         June 13, 2012 – The owner responded via email stating that the payment terms were not acceptable since the transactions were charged at the higher ZipCash rate and stated that the driver of the vehicle cannot pursue reimbursement from his/her employer due to a company policy.  The owner requested that all invoice due dates be extended to December 2012.
 
The processing and invoicing of these transactions and the extension of invoice due dates complied with the NTTA business rules. 
 
NTTA currently partners with a third party to acquire out-of-state vehicle information for our ZipCash billing process. NTTA aggressively pursues all tolls owed, whether the vehicle is registered in Texas or another state.  NTTA has stored all out-of-state transactions and will pursue them when cost effective to do so. These collections will be pursued under the same rules and processes that apply to in-state vehicle owners.  Learn more at NTTA> Customer Information> Rental & Out-of-State Vehicles.
 

CUSTOMER #0019
 
Summary of Circumstances:  A customer’s representative contacted NTTA Board of Directors on May 24, 2012, regarding a balance of more than $30,000 in tolls and fees owed.  The representative asked them to, “recall this debt from the agency, stop it from turning into citations/warrants, reduce the amount down to the actual toll tag violations owed and let us set up a payment plan for that balance.”  The representative then communicated with NTTA management requesting the same. 
 
Ombudsman’s Response:  Although the customer has a TollTag account, the invoiced transactions were associated with a different license plate number than listed in the account.  A review of transactions, invoices, system notes, and correspondence related to non-TollTag account the license plate revealed that 71 invoices were issued dated Jan. 20, 2011 through April 19, 2012. 
·         60 invoices are currently in the collection agency status
·         11 invoices are currently in the Second Notice of Nonpayment status
·         4 invoices that were aged to the citation status have been paid in full
 
The review also revealed the following contact between the representative and the NTTA regarding the outstanding balance.
·         Oct. 11, 2011 – The representative contacted the NTTA related to the balance due and information to contact courts related to citations.
·         May 11, 2012 – NTTA staff offered an extension on invoice due dates for open invoices and sent an email to the customer.  
·         May 24, 2012 – The representative emailed NTTA Board members requesting that they recall the debt, stop it from turning into citations/ warrants, a reduction in amount due, and set-up a payment plan.
·         May 31, 2012 – NTTA management advised the representative that tolls and administrative fees owed for the outstanding invoices would be reduced to $4,435.65 if the customer opened a TollTag account.
·         May 31, 2012 - The representative responded stating that the customer already had TollTag accounts, and the invoices are not related to the vehicles associated with those accounts.  Additionally, the representative stated that the customer could commit to paying the NTTA $75 every two weeks until the account balance was paid in full.
·         June 7, 2012 – NTTA management communicated that they would agree to a payment plan of $85 per week until outstanding balance was paid.
·         June 7, 2012 – The representative stated that $85 per week was not acceptable.
 
The processing and invoicing of these transactions complied with the NTTA business rules and business processes. When a vehicle without a TollTag travels through designated tolling points, a digital image of the vehicle’s license plate is captured. An invoice for the toll payment is sent to the registered owner of the vehicle according to Texas Department of Motor Vehicle records. The reduction in administrative fees charged also complied with NTTA business rules.
 
Although the extension of the invoice due dates for 12 months did not comply with NTTA business rules, the exception was in the customer’s favor.
 
CUSTOMER #00017
 
Summary of Circumstances:  The customer drove on NTTA toll roads, and an invoice was sent.  The customer disputes receiving the ZipCash invoice but acknowledges receipt of the First Notice of Nonpayment, both of which were mailed to the same address.   The customer contacted NTTA management on March 10, 2012, stating that he/she had not received the first invoice but did receive the First Notice of Nonpayment with the $8 administrative fee assessed and did not believe that the customer should have to pay the $8.  Customer also stated that “the postal service is an unreliable resource for tracking and mailing anything for that matter” and would agree to pay only the tolls due.
                                                                        
Ombudsman’s Response:  The Ombudsman reviewed the customer’s transactions and determined that the customer is not a TollTag holder. 
 
The NTTA mailed a ZipCash invoice and a First Notice of Nonpayment via the U.S. Postal Service and used the USPS Track-n-Trace service to confirm mailing and critical letter handling dates.  A ZipCash invoice dated Jan. 26, 2012, with a mail date of Feb. 2, 2012, went out for delivery on Feb. 3, 2012.  The First Notice of Nonpayment was mailed March 9, 2012, and out for delivery on March 10, 2012, per Track-n-Trace. Both items were mailed to the same address.
  
The customer emailed NTTA management March 10, 2012, regarding First Notice of Nonpayment stating that this was the first invoice received and it contained an $8 administrative fee.
 
The use of Track-n-Trace is recognized as a reliable mail tracking tool.  The processing and invoicing of these transactions complied with the NTTA business rules and state law. 
 
ZipCash customers receive invoices for their tolls based on their toll road usage, and invoices are mailed to the registered owner of the vehicle based on Texas Department of Motor Vehicle records. The longer a ZipCash invoice remains unpaid, the higher the related fees and fines will escalate.  Customers can avoid any fees by paying their ZipCash invoices, which cover tolls only, within 30 days.  
 

CUSTOMER #00016
 
Summary of Circumstances:  A vehicle registered in a state other than Texas is driven by a family member of the registered owner in Texas.  In January 2012, the customer/registered owner received and paid a first ZipCash invoice for transactions dated May 19, 2011 through May 26, 2011.  Since then, several additional invoices were received for transactions dating back to 2010 with tolls totaling approximately $600.  The customer stated that the family member in Texas did not know that he/she had been driving on a toll road and would have sought an alternative route had he/she known.  The customer is requesting that all tolls incurred prior to the January 2012 ZipCash invoice received be waived due the delay in invoicing the other tolls. 
                                                                             
Ombudsman’s Response: The Ombudsman reviewed the customer’s transactions and determined that the customer is not a TollTag holder. 
                                                                               
The NTTA requested vehicle ownership information from a third party on Nov. 7, 2011, and received it Nov. 30, 2011.  Because the car is registered in another state and has an out-of-state license plate, the request and matching of information is a manual process which takes more time than the automated process for vehicles registered in Texas. 
 
The invoices included only tolls for the ZipCash transactions.  No administrative fees were charged on the initial invoices. 
 
The customer contacted the NTTA chairman of the board and NTTA Customer Service several times as described below:
 
Jan. 13, 2012 – The customer called the NTTA stating that multiple invoices were received with the same due dates (Jan. 14, 2012) and requested that all tolls be waived since the family member driving the vehicle did not realize that he/she was on a toll road. 
 
Jan. 26, 2012 – The customer called the NTTA, and the call was escalated to management.  The manager extended the due dates for the invoices one year to Jan. 26, 2013.
 
Feb. 11, 2012 – The customer sent an email to the NTTA’s chairman of the board communicating that he/she had received an invoice in January 2012.  The customer stated that the individual driving the vehicle did not realize that he/she had been driving on a toll road, and he/she commented “that the exit for church was before reaches toll booth.”  The customer also stated that several additional invoices for tolls dating back to 2010 totaling over $600 had been received. The customer requested that the chairman approve “forgiveness of debt for violations prior to the first bill received in January 2012.”
 
Feb. 12-24, 2012 – Additional email communications were sent between the customer, NTTA chairman, and NTTA management.  The customer again requested the waiving of all the tolls still owed.  The chairman and management explained NTTA policy and communicated that roads are appropriately signed indicating that the road is a toll road. 
 
Although the processing and invoicing of these transactions complied with the NTTA business rules, extending the invoice due dates for 12 months did not.  However, this extension benefited the customer.
 
The NTTA has taken significant steps to design and post signs to ensure motorists are aware that they are entering a toll road and what the toll charges are.  Each NTTA toll road is identified with a “trailblazer sign” that informs all motorists that they are entering a toll road and there is a payment obligation.  These signs feature the word “toll” at the bottom of the sign and the name of the road (most of which include the word “tollway” or “toll bridge”).  In 2009, additional signs were updated system-wide to list both the TollTag and the ZipCash rate at every location. 
 
The NTTA pursues all tolls owed whether the vehicle is registered in Texas or any other state.  The NTTA stores all out-of-state transactions and pursues them when cost effective to do so.  These collections are pursued under the same rules and processes that apply to in-state vehicle owners.  The NTTA currently partners with a third-party vendor to acquire out-of-state vehicle registration information for the purpose of collecting tolls from customers traveling the system in a vehicle with an out-of-state license plate.  
 
According to the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles, new residents are required to register and title their vehicle and obtain a vehicle inspection within 30 days of moving to Texas.  (Visit www.txdmv.gov/vehicles/drivers/new_residents.htm for more information.)
 

CUSTOMER #00015
 
Summary of Circumstances: 
The customer contacted NTTA Customer Service Center on Sept. 12, 2011 regarding outstanding invoices and questioning that the full amount should be paid.  Customer sent three letters to the NTTA, one each on Oct. 3, 2011, Nov. 7, 2011, and Jan. 5, 2012,.  Each letter stated that customer was contacted via a letter from third party collection agency indicating that customer owed a total of $749.76, including $24.76 for unpaid tolls and $725 for related fees.  The customer stated that they called the NTTA Customer Service Center and “offered during the call to settle for a reasonable amount over the toll fees themselves, but this request was denied.”  The customer stated that the contact from the third party collection agency was the first time the customer became aware of the outstanding invoices.  The customer also stated that a check totaling $49.76 was mailed to the NTTA on Sept. 13, 2011, but it was returned.  The customer attached the same check to each of the three letters sent to the NTTA; the check was returned each time.  Customer also offered “if it would help to settle the matter, I would also be willing to open up a tolltag account for this vehicle.”
 
On Jan. 30, 2012, the customer sent a message to the Ombudsman to escalate the time and requested a call to explain their side of the story, and shared the following details:
 
1. “The vehicle in question is not driven by me.”
2.  “The day I [became] aware of the past-due tolls on this vehicle was the day I received the collections notice.  I have been trying to resolve this since, including sending checks well in excess of the amount of the tolls.”
3.  “The penalties being assessed by NTTA are not even allowed under current law.  While the new law went into effect after the tolls were incurred, the legislature clearly deemed the old fees as excessive.”
4.  “I have detailed knowledge of an identical situation to mine (the person liable for the tolls was unaware of them until the collections notice was received) where the penalties were waived in full.”
5.  “I offered to open up a Toll Tag account for this vehicle if that would help resolve this situation.”
 
Ombudsman’s Response:  The Ombudsman reviewed the customer’s history and determined that the customer is not a TollTag holder.  A review of the customer’s transactions, related invoices, system notes, and correspondence revealed the following:
 
Customer contacted the NTTA on numerous occasions including:
 
Sept. 12, 2011 – contacted the NTTA several times related to unpaid invoices that had aged to the third party collection agency phase.  The customer was offered a 40 percent discount on the unpaid administrative fees and plus actual tolls.  The customer called back to obtain amount of unpaid tolls and unpaid fees.  The customer declined the offer to pay the discounted amount.
 
A check totaling $49.76 dated Sept. 12, 2011, was sent to the NTTA.
 
Letters dated Oct. 3, 2011, Nov. 7, 2011, and Jan. 5, 2012, were received from the customer, each with a check totaling $49.76 dated Sept. 12, 2011.
 
Email sent to Ombudsman Jan. 30, 2011 related to the outstanding invoices.
 
Transactions from Feb. 16, 2011, through May 24, 2011, were included on three separate ZipCash invoices, each with individual due dates.  When payment was not received by each of the due dates, a Late Notice for each ZipCash Invoice was sent, each with individual due dates.  Payments for the three ZipCash Late Notices were not received.  The three ZipCash Late Notices converted to three Violation Invoices.  Dates for each of the ZipCash Invoices, Late Notices and Violation invoices are listed below.
 
ZipCash Invoice Date
ZipCash Invoice Due Date
Late Notice Invoice Date
Late Notice Invoice Due Date
Violation Invoice Date
March 26, 2011
April 28, 2011
May 2, 2011
May 19, 2011
July 19, 2011
April 25, 2011
May 28, 2011
June 2, 2011
June 19, 2011
July 19, 2011
June 8, 2011
July 11, 2011
July 15, 2011
Aug. 1, 2011
Aug. 2, 2011
 
NTTA mailed all nine invoices to the same address as listed with the Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) ownership records as of Jan. 31, 2012.  DMV records do not indicate an ownership name or address change for this license plate number since Aug. 7, 2010.
 
NTTA did not receive returned mail or bad address notification related to these nine invoices.
 
Customer account was sent to third party collection agency on Sept. 1, 2011.
 
The third party collection agency sent letter to same address as previous nine invoices were mailed.
 
Customer could not be contacted through phone number provided.
 
The processing and invoicing of these transactions complied with the NTTA business rules, but the aging of invoices did not. Payment for ZipCash Late Notices is due within 15 days according to the business rules in effect before Sept. 1, 2011.  If ZipCash Late Notices remain unpaid they age to Violation Invoices; payment for Violation Invoices is due within 30 days.  The aging of these invoices did not comply with NTTA business rules.  However, this error was in the customer’s favor, which provided additional time to pay the invoices before they were forwarded to collections.  Therefore, the invoice aging process did not comply with NTTA business rules. 
               
The NTTA sends invoices to the registered owner’s address according to DMV records.  Management’s decision to offer a reduction of the administrative fees complied with NTTA business rules in place prior to the implementation of Senate Bill 469, which changed billing requirements.  The administrative fees charged on the individual invoices as they aged through the system complied with Transportation Code 366.178, which governs the NTTA.  SB469 became effective with ZipCash transactions as of Sept. 1, 2011.  Since the customer’s ZipCash invoices originated prior to Sept. 1, 2011, the NTTA complied with applicable codes and law.
 
Effective Sept. 1, 2011, the ZipCash billing process changed, pursuant to Senate Bill 469.  An outline of the ZipCash billing process is available at www.NTTA.org.  Customers can avoid all administrative fees by paying the tolls within 30 days of receipt as required by ZipCash invoices.
 

Customer #0014
 
Summary of Circumstances:  Customer contacted NTTA Customer Service on Jan. 12, 2012, seeking assistance with “some issues with outstanding tolls.”  The customer communicated that they lived in Dallas from 2001 to 2010.  In 2006, the customer paid three separate JP court fees related to unpaid tolls that had aged to the DPS citation process phase.  In December 2011, the customer received three separate invoices for toll transactions that were incurred in 2007, followed a week later by a fourth invoice for outstanding tolls from 2010.  On Dec. 27, 2011, the customer contacted the NTTA Customer Service Center to verify receipt of payment for the four invoices, which were paid with four separate checks, and to confirm that there were no additional outstanding tolls.  During this conversation, the customer was informed that $1,300 was owed for outstanding tolls and associated violation fees from 2002 transactions.  The customer requested the fees be eliminated and only the tolls be paid.
 
The customer requested the total number of outstanding transactions and was provided a response of 198 total transactions (tolls) on Jan. 17, 2012. 
 
Ombudsman’s Response:  The Ombudsman reviewed the customer’s history and determined that the customer is not a TollTag holder.  A review of the customer’s transactions, related invoices, system notes, and correspondence revealed the following:
 
Customer has contacted the NTTA on numerous occasions including:

 

·         Oct. 12, 2004 – contacted the NTTA related to citations for unpaid tolls.  The NTTA offered to waive the administrative fees and require payment only for the unpaid tolls if the customer opened a TollTag account.

 

·         Nov. 12, 2004 – The NTTA offered to reduce the past-due administrative fees by 66 percent plus payment of unpaid tolls if the customer opened a TollTag account.

 

·         Nov. 17, 2004 – The customer emailed the NTTA several times offering deals to clear the invoices.  According to NTTA records, the customer wanted to negotiate the amount to be paid.

 

·         Dec. 9, 2004 – The customer did not appear in court.
·         May 17, 2007 – The customer stated that invoices had been resolved when court costs were paid.  However, the NTTA informed the customer that when paid a receipt should be taken to the court.  The NTTA also informed the customer that invoices had not been paid as the courts do not collect tolls and associated fees on behalf of the NTTA.
·         May 17, 2007 – The customer’s call was elevated to a customer service lead who offered to reduce the administrative fees by 66 percent plus the unpaid tolls if the customer opened  TollTag account, signed a VEA and submitted payment by a deadline; otherwise offer to reduce fees would be void.
·         Aug. 30, 2011 through Nov. 26, 2011 – transactions were unassigned from invoices due to bad addresses and reassigned to current address according to Department of Motor Vehicles records
·         Dec. 22, 2011 – reprints for three ZipCash invoices were requested.
·         Jan. 9, 2012 – ZipCash payment was received on same date that the late fees were added so administrative fees were waived and invoice was collected at the ZipCash rate.
·         January 2012 – the customer and the NTTA exchanged emails related to: a) the payment of the court costs and request to eliminate the fees owed in order to only pay the tolls due, b) having 198 unpaid tolls which customer stated he/she was told the week prior that there were only 11 unpaid tolls.
 
Four invoices related to transactions dated 2007 through 2011 have been paid by the customer.  These invoices were paid in January 2012.
 
Currently there are 198 open unpaid transactions that occurred from 2002 through 2007.
 
The unpaid transactions total $2,955.80 ($140.20 in unpaid tolls and $2,815.60 in unpaid fees).
 
DMV records from August 2002 to November 2011 indicated  five different addresses identified with this customer; most current update occurred Nov. 18, 2011.
 
The processing and invoicing of these transactions were compliant with the NTTA business rules and business processes in place at the time. The longer an invoice remains unpaid, the higher the related fees escalate.  Invoices are mailed to the registered owner of the vehicle according to DMV records, and motorists are responsible for updating their vehicle registration information with the DMV.  Management’s decision to reduce the administrative fees charged was compliant with NTTA business rules.
 
Effective Sept. 1, 2011, the ZipCash billing process changed, pursuant to Senate Bill 469.  An outline of the ZipCash billing process is available at www.NTTA.org.  Customers can avoid all administrative fees by paying the tolls within 30 days of receipt as required by ZipCash invoices.